Integrating VXLAN with Avaya VENA Fabric Connect

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January 7th, 2013

by Avaya

VXLAN, VMware’s attempt at creating a next-generation VLAN technology, is intended to help businesses maximize the effectiveness of their server virtualization activities. Officially, “Virtual Extensible LAN (VXLAN) works by creating Layer 2 logical networks that are encapsulated in standard Layer 3 IP packets. A ‘Segment ID’ in every frame differentiates the VXLAN logical networks from each other without any need for VLAN tags. This allows very large numbers of isolated Layer 2 VXLAN networks to co-exist on a common Layer 3 infrastructure.” The intent is to build virtual domains on top of a common networking and virtualization infrastructure, with these virtual domains having complete isolation from each other and the underlying network. This is the theory anyway. However, the initial VXLAN specification was based on some rather conventional networking concepts and did not make allowance for groundbreaking work that had already been undertaken within the IEEE in defining Shortest Path Bridging (SPB).

Accelerating the Deployment of Virtualized Applications in the Data Center Introducing Avaya Collaboration Pods

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December 5th, 2012

by Avaya

Avaya Collaboration Pods are turnkey solutions consisting of virtualized server, storage, networking and management components all fine-tuned to deliver maximum performance of Avaya application solutions over the underlying data center infrastructure. With fully integrated management and support, the solution enables rapid deployment of complex technologies, including virtualized applications and services, storage and networking, while simplifying the task of operating technologies from multiple vendors.

A Unified Network for the Mobile Era

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November 26th, 2012

By Avaya

Thanks to Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), the enterprise wireless LAN (WLAN) has become the network of choice, and as such, networks are expected to support an increasing number of real-time applications, such as voice and video communications. Yet WLANs were not designed to meet business demands for performance, scalability, consolidated management, improved Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and, more importantly, security. So how should an enterprise address the expectations of its increasingly mobile workforce in this BYOD-driven era? The answer is an intelligent, easily managed network that is truly unified and smart enough to deliver services rapidly and seamlessly. Bottom line: the answer is Avaya Virtual Enterprise Network Architecture (VENA) Unified Access.