Lippis Report Issue 86: Communications-Enabled Business Processes (CEBP): An Outlook

July 16th, 2007

In this Lippis Report we explore the emerging market for Communications- Enabled Business Processes (CEBP) and provide an outlook. Late last summer the IP telephony industry accelerated its software focus with the Unified Communications and CEBP initiatives and offerings from all major suppliers. Unified Communications is in essence a single launch point or portal to gain access to multiple communication applications with tools such as click-to-call, instant messaging, click-to-conferencing, and many others. CEBP injects communications into business process in order to reduce human and system delay, hoping to speed workflow and increase the response of an organization to business events. Unified Communications is being delivered to market via packaged software and massive distribution channels thanks to Microsoft and IBM. CEBP is different. Each enterprise will have a unique entry point for CEBP based upon their process improvement priorities, funding, and project business case strength. CEBP, by definition is a custom project. There are business process modeling consulting organizations, which are today´s efficiency engineers, working through business process to save an organization time and money. But CEBP promises to be much more; it promises to deliver a new kind of agile and competitive organization that can respond to business events quickly, satisfy customers more deeply, and in the process create competitive barriers of entry. We explore these hopes and promises and provide an outlook for the CEBP market.

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Event-Driven Architectures in the Responsive Enterprise

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July 16th, 2007

By Avaya

To be competitive in today´s real-time world requires greater business agility than ever before. Organizations and their people are working faster, and have to respond ever more quickly and effectively to real-time business events. The rigid silos that exist today between business applications and communication capabilities limit information exchange and impede enterprise agility. The good news is that new solutions are emerging that can flexibly link applications, business intelligence, and communications together to create a new class of synergistic business processes that increase the ability of an enterprise to respond to threats and opportunities.

Communications-Enabled Business Processes (CEBP) help enterprises enhance operational efficiency, worker productivity and customer satisfaction by streamlining human engagement in critical business processes. These solutions integrate with business process applications to predict and sense events, then respond by managing real-time multi-channel communication with process users and decision-makers. This speeds response times, reduces human delays, and frees workers from managing communications details so they can focus on making decisions and resolving issues before they impact customers.

This white paper introduces the concept of Event-Driven Architecture (EDA) and describes the key role it plays in enabling new business strategies for Communications-Enabled Business Processes. This is one of the best CEBP papers I have read.

SAP NetWeaver® AND ENTERPRISE SERVICES ARCHITECTURE
Using IT Practices to Bridge the Worlds of Business and IT

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July 16th, 2007

By SAP

Organizations that can enable complex IT services quickly and cost effectively have a significant competitive advantage. But this kind of agility requires an IT infrastructure that enables the seamless integration of business processes and information in disparate applications, collaboration among all involved parties, and the rapid management and adaptation of business processes. Traditional IT infrastructures make the rapid development of flexible IT services nearly impossible. Building business processes that span organizational units means building links between heterogeneous systems, an expensive and time-consuming proposition. And modifying existing functionality can be prohibitively difficult or even impossible.

Web services and service-oriented architectures are huge strides in simplifying application integration. Web services offer a standardized and vendor-agnostic way to cope with heterogeneous systems and to create interoperability. But Web services are insufficient to the task. They are too granular to be efficient building blocks for enterprise business scenarios, and they do not yet provide a way to ensure semantic interoperability. To efficiently develop new business solutions that leverage existing applications, you need business-level building blocks that aggregate the benefits of multiple Web services and that simplify interoperability between them. In other words, you need Enterprise Services Architecture.

Improve the Event Resolution Process
Top 10 Requirements Identified

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July 16th, 2007

By AlarmPoint Systems

This paper provides business and IT leaders with a brief introduction to the strategic benefits associated with an effective alignment between IT services and the business processes IT supports. IT operations must adapt faster with more strategic direction than any other business unit within an enterprise to remain effective. This paper examines the necessary requirement for Event Notification and Resolution applications. While most IT organizations have monitoring and trouble ticketing applications in place, they are still missing a key component. Interactive alerting applications bridge the gap between the IT applications and the personnel who can solve IT events, thereby ensuring IT services continue uninterrupted.

Safeguarding Our Nation´s Campuses and Facilities
A Dozen Best Practices from the Emergency Alerting Experiences of the Department of Defense

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July 16th, 2007

by AtHoc

Campuses and facilities have accelerated their search for effective emergency notification systems in light of the recent tragedy at Virginia Tech and the hostage situation at NASA´s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The Department of Defense has been using sophisticated emergency alerting platforms for years, and its experiences and best practices can serve as a valuable resource for any organization or facility looking to bolster emergency communications for a single or multiple connected facilities. From creating a multi-channel alerting network over an existing IP network to connecting its systems to other first response organizations, the DoD has set the standard for effective emergency alerting. This paper outlines the parallels that can be drawn between facilities´ current needs and those of the DoD, and it outlines the dozen best practices that should be considered when selecting an emergency notification solution.

Communications-Enabled Business Processes: The Next Change Agent

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July 16th, 2007

David Butler, Director of Business Solutions...David Butler, Avaya´s Director of Business Solutions and Partners in Emerging Technologies and Julien Courbe, BearingPoint´s Managing Director of Financial Services Technology join the Lippis Report podcast to discuss the emerging communications-enabled business processes (CEBP) market. CEBP promises to deliver a new kind of agile and competitive organization that can respond to business events quickly, satisfy customers more deeply and in the process create competitive barriers of entry. But how will CEBP be brought to market? Is CEBP customized for every corporation or will there be packaged or partially pre-defined and integrated solutions? Find out by listening to this podcast.

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Lippis Report Issue 84: Fixed Mobile Point Conversion

June 3rd, 2007

I am redefining the term for enterprise-based fixed mobile convergence (FMC) with Mobile Unified Communications. FMC is the linking of fixed telephony end-points such as desktop phones and messaging with mobile devices. Unified Communications is making FMC obsolete as business and IT leaders search for solutions to provide mobile executives with the same features on the road as they have in the office. All the major IP telephony providers are busy extending their UC features and interfaces to mobile devices, which far outstrips the single vmail box, PBX features on mobile phones and fixed/mobile phone ringing tricks provided by FMC. IP telephony companies such as Avaya have purchased Traverse Networks to extend their mobile UC offering while Cisco purchased Orative to do the same. The offerings of both companies deliver value far above traditional FMC capabilities.

To make this point, we´ll focus this Lippis Report on Avaya´s FMC to Mobile Unified Communications MUC offering. Clearly there are many other firms such as Cisco, Siemens, Nortel, Mitel, Alcatel-Lucent that are on the same FMC to MUC journey and in another Lippis Report we may profile each of these firms.

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An Introduction to Wireless Mesh Networking

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June 3rd, 2007

By Firetide

Wireless networks provide mobility for laptop and PDA users who no longer need wires to stay connected to their workplace and the Internet. Ironically, the very devices that provide wireless service need lots of wiring themselves to connect to private networks and the Internet. This white paper presents a viable alternative to all those wires – the wireless mesh network. The paper covers basic mesh concepts and technologies, key capabilities needed to deploy an effective and robust solution, and target applications in both private and public networks.

Mobility & Cost Savings in a Multi-site Environment

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June 3rd, 2007

By QuesCom

When multi-national corporations connect their VoIP traffic through traditional global service provider offerings, cost usually soars. But GSM infrastructure can be leveraged to provide site-to-site connectivity for both intra- and inter- country communications thanks to GSM gateways and SIP trunking.

Wireless Solutions for Security and Surveillance

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June 3rd, 2007

By Proxim

In the post 9/11 world, terrorism, law enforcement, border patrol, public safety and monitoring challenges have forced government organizations and enterprises worldwide to elevate security and surveillance to a top priority. These challenges have manifested as significant growth in the video surveillance market which in turn has created a huge opportunity for system integrators, equipment manufacturers, software vendors and chip companies to compress, capture, transport and archive these large amounts of video traffic. Technology advances in video, wireless and software now make it possible to use cost-effective fixed and mobile wireless solutions for comprehensive security and surveillance applications.

This white paper provides an overview of the market drivers for security and surveillance applications, the benefits of wireless solutions, deployment considerations and also presents an overview of Proxim’s carrier grade wireless solutions to acquire, transport, record, and analyze video applications.

Grene Vision Group Gains 20/20 IT Vision with Avaya Interoperability and Mobility

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June 3rd, 2007

by Avaya, case study

With continuing growth and separate telephone systems across 26 locations, Grene Vision Group was unable to operate effectively as a single company. It deployed Avaya Media Servers, Avaya Media Gateways, and Avaya telephony applications in a networked IP telephony architecture to gain interoperability, mobility, scalability, and availability.

Avaya Self Mobility Case Study: Boosting Its Productivity, Responsiveness And Creating A Branded Customer Experience

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June 3rd, 2007

By Avaya, case study

Providing mobility services and tools for its highly mobile workforce would not only help the company meet its business goals but would also create an in-house model for Avaya customers who were implementing mobility strategies in their own businesses. With a focus on the same mobility strategies prescribed to its customers, Avaya implemented IP Telephony-enabled mobility applications to equip its employees with wired and wireless mobility solutions, allowing them to conduct business seamlessly whether in the office, in a remote location or on the road.

Avaya Mobility Solutions

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June 3rd, 2007

By Avaya

An account representative working from a customer site. A shipping supervisor roaming the warehouse floor. A salesperson living in airport lounges and hotel rooms. Business has seen the future, and it´s mobile. According to the Yankee Group´s December 2006 Report, Enterprises Strive to Better Connect the Mobile Workforce, in the US more than 50 million workers will be mobile in 2007. This represents 42% of the workforce ?¬¢‚Äö√ᬮ‚Äö√Ñ√∫ an increase of 31% since 2002. Many companies now spend more on wireless than wireline ?¬¢‚Äö√ᬮ‚Äö√Ñ√∫ in some cases, without even knowing it. And the trend towards a fully mobile workforce is expected to accelerate. Mobility provides convenience, flexibility and efficiency and is also a key component of both business continuity planning and a Unified Communications strategy.

Lippis Report Issue 82: Securing Unified Communications Infrastructure

May 7th, 2007

Unified Communications (UC) deployment is well underway. Of the big vendors, Avaya, Cisco, Siemens and Alcatel are delivering product today while Nortel and Microsoft promise UC and ask that you hold off purchasing competitive products. Innovative Communications Alliance (ICA), the Nortel/Microsoft joint venture, is scheduled to provide product guidance in June, a full year after its announcement. Mitel, Shortel, 3Com, IBM, Interactive Intelligence, NEC, Ericsson, AVST, Oracle, TeleWare, Objectworld, et al., are delivering UC. With the IP telephony, telecommunications and application industries focused on taking their share of the emerging $35B to $40B annual UC market it´s inevitable that UC will soon be a fact of corporate life. So the question is: are you ready? Is your infrastructure secure enough to support UC?

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