Nexus® 9000 Programmable Network Environment

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November 6th, 2013

By Nick Lippis

The definition of Software-Defined Networking being the separation of data and control plane offered little to DevOps professionals or network engineers seeking a programming environment to customize their network and automate opera¬tional tasks. With the introduction of the Nexus® 9000, Cisco is offering the most compre¬hensive set of network programming options that delivers programming tools through an enhanced version of the Nexus Operating System (or NX-OS), which ranges from direct switch programming via its built-in Linux BASH environment, open RESTful APIs with JSON and XML support, direct integration with Python, etc. Most network engineers will opt to enroll in a Linux programming course versus obtaining another CCIE certification after reading this Lippis Report Research Note. In this research note, we review Cisco’s new programming environment detailing its options, use cases and industry impact.

10 Gigabit Ethernet: Enabling Storage Networking for Big Data

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October 21st, 2013

by Arista Networks

As 10 and 40GbE data center networks provide very low latency with less than 10ns of jitter and favorable price points, the ability to converge storage and user traffic onto one physical network has become realistic. In this white paper, Arista details various cloud provider storage options and how they can gain from transporting block storage flows over a 10GbE network.

Arista eAPI

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September 23rd, 2013

by Arista Networks

Arista EOS offers multiple programmable interfaces for applications. These interfaces can be leveraged by applications running on the switch, or external to EOS. Arista’s newest interface, EOS API (eAPI), allows applications and scripts to have complete programmatic control over EOS, with a stable and easy to use syntax. Once the API is enabled, the switch accepts commands using Arista’s CLI syntax, and responds with machine-readable output and errors serialized in JSON, served over HTTP. DevOps teams will be very impressed.