A Realistic Approach To Dynamic Workload Scaling

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October 9th, 2012

Dave Dhillon, Product Marketing Manager, Cisco Systems

Dynamic Workload Scaling or Cloud bursting is commonly referred to as the ability to expand or contract workload between two or more virtualized data centers or cloud providers.  It sounds simple enough, but there has not been a practical approach to securely and automatically facilitate elastic IT resources in response to demand.  Cisco Systems is offering one of the most realistic approaches to cloud bursting that leverages the Nexus 7000 and its Application Control Engine or ACE load balancers.  Overlay Transport Virtualization or (OTV) is a feature of the Nexus 7000 and provides Layer 2 connectivity extension across any transport connecting two or more data centers.  ACE provides VM aware load balancing over OTV, which creates the basis for Cisco’s Dynamic Workload Scaling cloud bursting strategy.  I talk with Dave Dhillon Product Marketing Manager at Cisco Systems as we dive into Cisco’s approach to cloud bursting.

Duration: 9 minutes 59 seconds

Lippis Intro/Analysis @ : 00:10 sec

Question 1 @ 2:01 sec: let’s start with a Dynamic Workload Scaling definition and how much demand Cisco sees for this capability?

Question 2 @ 3:46 sec:  Ok great, so let’s talk about Cisco’s Dynamic Workload Scaling approach.  It leverages ACE, OTV, Nexus 7000 and its partnership with VMware.   Can you talk to the piece parts of the approach and how they work together to deliver Dynamic Workload Scaling?

Question 3 @ 6:53 sec: Thank for solution overview, so what are the new levels of business flexibility or outcomes enabled when Dynamic Workload Scaling is implemented?

Question 4 @ 7:59 sec: How do IT business leaders implement DWS in their private clouds?

 

Cisco’s Familiar Approach To A Unified Multi-Protocol Storage Network

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July 30th, 2012

Cisco’s multi-protocol storage initiative brings all storage protocols into its unified fabric. Just like the days of multi-protocol routing, IT managers were able to manage the transition to IP networking after routing supported multiple network protocols such as DECnet, AppleTalk, etc. In short applications that relied upon vendor specific protocols were supported and thus the transition to IP was regulated by how fast the application could support IP. The same is true in modern data centers; build a unified fabric that is capable of supporting multi-protocol storage and IT business leaders can transition to a single storage protocol over time and gain simplification, lower life cycle cost and faster application deployment. Rajeev Bhardwaj, Sr. Director of Product Management in the data center group at Cisco Systems is responsible for the MDS, Nexus and load balancing products making him the ideal executive to discuss multi-protocol storage networking and the transition toward a converged or unified data center infrastructure.

Lippis Report 161: The New Nimble and Innovative Avaya

November 15th, 2010

nicklippis.jpgFor as long as I have been following Avaya—and it’s been a decade since it was spun out of Lucent back in October of 2000—it has undergone three fundamental transitions. First, Don Peterson, Avaya’s first CEO, managed to fix Avaya’s balance sheet after Lucent saddled it with heavy debt. He also pointed the way toward IP telephony in his six years at the helm. Then came Louis D’Ambrosio, with high energy and confidence, to point Avaya in the direction of unified communications, and a software and services business model, while bringing the company private in 2007 through TPG Capital and Silver Lake Partners. In 2008, Charlie Giancarlo became chairman, while Kevin Kennedy took the helm, ushering in a new wave of innovation and nimbleness while re-engineering sales and channels plus absorbing the Nortel enterprise business. Yes, what a long, strange trip it’s been, but Avaya is now the most innovative in its history and well positioned for the post-recession business cycle. In this Lippis Report Research Note, we examine Avaya’s prospects and challenges.

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