Lippis Report 219: What Is Happening to Open Networking?

March 18th, 2014

nick_podium2It was so simple; the separation of network hardware from software through a protocol called OpenFlow would open up the networking industry by injecting innovation into a vertically integrated industry. Specialized network hardware, called routers and switches, would give way to low cost white box alternatives, built in Asia, that were centrally controlled by software running on x86 commodity hardware. The networking industry would split into three parts: those that sold data forwarding gear, controller software and network applications. Well, that was 2010, and the reality is that this model of Open Networking has not materialized in the enterprise market—perhaps in a few operator and hyperscale networks, but not the real markets: the enterprise and public sector environments. Open Networking has taken on a life of its own. Overlays or virtualized networking are coming into their own; white box solutions without OpenFlow are being piloted in the enterprise and deployed in select cloud providers and operator networks; Linux is being considered as a network operating system to enable automation and normalize management tools across compute, storage and networking. The wide area, and in particular, branch office networking is about to undergo a fundamental change, thanks to new open networking solutions entering the market that promise radically lower cost, centralized policy provisioning control and service enablement. Hardware appliances are under attack in both branch office and data centers as vendors start to offer network service virtualization or NSV. Open networking security, or the lack thereof, is now coming into focus as is the killer SDN application: IP storage. In this Lippis Report Research Note, we provide a snapshot of the fast-pace changes occurring in Open Networking.
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Transforming the Mobile Experience with Cisco Wireless Location Services

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March 18th, 2014

By Cisco Systems

It’s a mobile world, with almost 7 billion mobile subscribers worldwide in 2013, the equivalent of almost one device for every person on the planet. The rapid increase in mobile devices is making Wi-Fi a preferred method of network access, with the United States having more than 1 mobile device per person and 125 million smartphones shipped every year. With this growth rate, and a predicted 10 billion mobile devices by 2016, organizations can look to mobility and the Wi-Fi network to deliver innovative user services and enhanced customer experience. At the same time, this trend presents businesses with both tremendous opportunities and unique challenges, and numerous innovative businesses are rapidly emerging to help unlock business value from this growth.

Arista EOS: Smart System Upgrade

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March 18th, 2014

By Arista Networks

Deploying and taking advantage of new technology is top of mind for most organizations. Balancing the business benefits of adopting a rapid pace of innovation with the associated risks is a constant struggle; one most are losing. A major inhibitor to technology adoption is the ability to transparently insert new technologies into existing facilities without adversely impacting critical applications. The difficulty in doing this has had an almost paralytic effect on the adoption of beneficial new technologies. Unfortunately, operating with outmoded equipment can severely impact your bottom line causing further erosion in already shrinking budgets. Find out how Smart System Upgrade can help.