Lippis Report 180: Cisco Delivers New VPN Design Options for Federal Government and Enterprise Networks

October 25th, 2011

Cisco recently launched its VPN Internal Service Module or VPN ISM, which is a VPN accelerator for the Integrated Services Routers Generation 2 (ISR G2). The VPN ISM allows for greater VPN performance, meaning a larger number of faster VPN connections for both client-to-site and site-to-site communications. This module expands the range of branch office network design options allowing IT designers to architects lower cost and higher performance Wide Area Network (WAN) design paid for by arbitraging WAN facilities/operational cost and capital cost. In addition to the enterprise market, the VPN ISM supports the National Security Agency’s or NSA’s Suite B cryptographic algorithms in hardware, boosting performance of previous Suite B implementations by a factor of three to five, depending upon application. In this Lippis Report Research Note, we review the VPN ISM with a focus on the new WAN design options it affords for both federal government and enterprise IT departments.

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Fit-for-Purpose Data Center Networking

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October 24th, 2011

Simplified and optimized service orchestration maximizes the return from a virtualized computing environment
By Avaya

This white paper discusses Avaya’s approach to Data center Networking from a fabric perspective. Virtualization within the data center is now taken for granted, with some declaring that ‘Cloud Computing’ will be the choice of most enterprises and that applications and information will become commodities. Experience has proved one thing; the data center of the future cannot be built on the technology of the past. General-purpose products, outmoded techniques, and legacy designs cannot be re-packaged as ‘data center-ready’. Ethernet is readily available, cost-effective, extensible, and – as the 40/100 Gigabit developments prove – scalable. Find out Avaya’s approach to data center networking fabric by downloading this white paper.

The Economics of Networking

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October 12th, 2011

A third-party business consulting firm analyzed the total cost of ownership (TCO) of Cisco enterprise customer networks, and contrasted that TCO to “good enough” networks from other networking vendors. Key findings:
1) TCO is a better metric than CapEx to assess network cost because it considers the full impact on IT spend, including CapEx, services, labor, bandwidth and energy.
2) The Cisco Borderless Network Architecture can deliver up to 13% better TCO than a “good enough” network, offering compelling value for the strategic Cisco investment.
3) Even if architectural benefits are discounted in the analysis, Cisco is, at most, a 7% TCO premium over other vendors due to IT labor savings and extended product lifecycles from Cisco solutions.
4) The single biggest benefit of Cisco’s architectural approach is labor savings. Labor constitutes 50% of TCO and Cisco delivers 5% to 10% labor savings driven by unified wired and wireless and embedded security.
5) A quality network delivers business benefits beyond TCO, including improved network uptime, higher user productivity and a lower threat of security breaches.

PoE Jumps to 60W/Port to Power Virtualized Desktops and More

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October 12th, 2011

Power over Ethernet or PoE has evolved from delivering 7 Watts/port to support IP phones to now 60 Watts/port to power a wide range of devices that span WLAN access points, surveillance video cameras, video conferencing end points, IP turrets for financial trading, and now, thin client desktop devices to support virtualized desktops. The current high PoE standard is IEEE 802.3at that details 30 Watts/port, so Cisco’s Universal PoE or UPOE solution at 60W is a pre-standard offering. The key point about UPOE is that it provides a new range of design options in both power distribution, but more importantly, how virtualized desktops and other electronics are powered. Pradeep Parmar, Senior Marketing Manager, Borderless Networks, at Cisco Systems, joins me to talk about the fundamental change PoE is taking, thanks to Cisco’s UPOE solution.

Arista Network’s Ken Duda Explains VxLAN, the first Virtual Networking Protocol

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October 12th, 2011

The problems of network configuration changes required when virtualization operations managers need to move a VM between subnets are well documented. There are virtual networking options to solve this problem such as building very large flat networks, tunneling between subnets, and now a standard approach called VXLAN. VXLAN is a special encapsulation mechanism that runs between virtual switches and enables VMs to be deployed and moved on or between any server within the network. VXLAN requires no changes to the underlying IP addressing architecture and should require no major changes to installed infrastructure in the data center. Ken Duda Founder and Vice President, Software Engineering at Arista Networks joins me to discuss VXLAN, the first major protocol of virtual networking.