Lippis Report 116: IT Was The Problem In ’01; Now It’s The Solution

December 15th, 2008

I believe in IT. Even with all the gloom in the economic news, IT will play a major role in the recovery. This economic mess is not a typical business cycle of supply and demand balance or imbalance. It’s rooted in the greed of a few who sold sub-prime mortgages to those who could not afford them, rating agencies that gave AAA rating to BBB sub-prime mortgage-backed bonds, investment banks that solicited investors to short these bonds only so they could use the short to synthesize and multiply the number of bad bonds which eventually clogged the credit market and ignited the stock market crash of 2008. This cycle of greed has and will continue to cost us, our children and our grandchildren dearly as we are forced to bail out financial institutions, the auto industry and fund a stimulus package sized in the $500 to $700 billion range. With this concerning economic backdrop, I believe in IT more now than at any other time in my career. Why? Because after all the cost cutting, reduction in force or layoffs, supply chain rationalization, expense reduction initiatives, etc., IT is the only tool humans have to improve and sustain productivity gains.

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Upgrading the Datacenter to 10 Gigabit Ethernet

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December 15th, 2008

By Arista Networks

The standard for 10 Gigabit Ethernet (IEEE802.3ae) was ratified in 2002. While 10 GigE deployments have grown every year since then, the technology has primarily been used to interconnect switches and routers. Almost all the server connections in datacenters have remained at 1 Gbps, limiting the amount of network throughput available to each server. The primary reason for this has been cost-performance. Historically it has been more cost-effective to have multiple GigE connections rather than a single 10 GigE port. In addition, today’s servers typically cannot utilize the full bandwidth of a 10 GigE connection. However both of these factors are changing, which will lead to widespread adoption of 10 GigE for server connections over the next few years.

This white paper is an overview of the factors that are driving the growth for 10 GigE in the datacenter; download it now.

IP Storage over 10 Gigabit Ethernet

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December 15th, 2008

By Force10 Networks

The term “IP storage” refers to storage networks that access data resources over IP/Ethernet rather than direct attached storage (DAS) devices. IP Storage is also an alternative to special-purpose storage area networks (SANs) based on storage-specific networking protocols, such as the fibre channel protocol (FCP). This paper highlights the unique advantages of IP storage over 10 Gigabit Ethernet and the different types of storage architectures that can take advantage of cost and performance benefits of high performance Ethernet. As 10 GbE infrastructure products continue to mature and ride the traditional Ethernet cost-volume learning curve, enterprise adoption of IP storage is expected to accelerate significantly. Over the last few months, the street prices of copper-based 10 GbE switch ports and adapters have dropped to near or below $1000, which means 10 GbE performance at price points that could drive rapid adoption in the marketplace. As prices continue to decline, adoption will increase dramatically, driving the 10 GbE switch market to worldwide market size of $4.6B by 2011, according to the Dell’Oro Group. The number of 10 GbE ports shipped is expected to grow at an annual rate in excess of 100 percent, reaching 12 million ports shipped in 2011. As the switch/router market expands, the 10 GbE adapter market is expected to grow to approximately $3B by 2011.

Find out how to use IP storage over GbE by downloading this paper.

Boost Revenue and Customer Satisfaction with Managed Application-Acceleration Service

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December 15th, 2008

By Cisco Systems

A burgeoning global trend toward branch-infrastructure consolidation is creating a significant new managed-service opportunity. Enterprises that centralize their application, file, and print services need assurance that their branch-office employees can access services over the WAN as quickly as they could over the LAN. Service providers can meet this need by offering a managed application-acceleration service in conjunction with their existing Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) VPN service. Cisco estimates that the worldwide market for managed application-acceleration services will reach US$1.3 billion in 2011. The total revenue opportunity is even greater because enterprise customers that subscribe to the service are also candidates for additional managed services, including high availability, managed security, co-location, and storage. Providers who introduce a managed application-acceleration service have a strong value proposition. The service optimizes branch-office application, file, and print services across the WAN while also reducing operational expenses, increasing operational efficiency, and enabling centralizing backup, which protects data and helps ensure regulatory compliance. Good candidates for the service have a few to thousands of branches and might be initiating consolidation efforts, experiencing slow application performance, or beginning WAN refresh projects.

This white paper, intended for service provider business executives, explains why business customers subscribe to a managed application-acceleration.

Network Energy Efficiency

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December 15th, 2008

By Cisco Systems

In today’s business, when considering energy efficiency and power consumption in the context of networking and communications equipment, two areas are in sharp focus:

The effects on overall expense

The resulting environmental footprint

The path to green IT begins with devices that operate efficiently. But what is more important is how these devices work together to create systems and environments that result in lower greenhouse gas emissions. At Cisco, the approach to green IT is to design and build best-in-class energy-efficient networking devices that support multiple services. This helps ensure that individual devices—and the network as a whole—operate efficiently through service and device consolidation. From there, these devices and networks are used to create communications systems that promote even greater energy efficiencies and green rewards by changing business behavior and creating opportunities for sustainable operations.

Gaining Network Visibility Into Virtualized Infrastructure

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December 15th, 2008

Podcast guest Stephen Garrison of Force10 NetworksYou can’t manage what you can’t measure and this could not be truer for virtualized data center infrastructure. Virtualized infrastructure reduces energy consumption, software license fees and provides a flexible data center that can spin up and down services as demand dictates. But the lack of network visibility to manage and optimize this infrastructure is giving many IT leaders pause. Virtual ports that support numerous logical flows to a single blade running across multiple virtual machines eliminate management, optimization and troubleshooting tools previous available. Stephen Garrison, VP of Marketing for Force10 Networks joins me to talk about strategies and tactics that deliver visibility into virtualized IT infrastructure. If you’re building or trying to manage a virtualized data center, then you need to listen to this podcast.