Is Your Network Ready for Video?

Listen to the Podcast

April 23rd, 2008

Guest Kumar SrikantanIP video is being massively consumed in the consumer and corporate markets. In 2007 IP video exceeded the total sum of 2000 internet traffic which was nearly 25 Petabytes/month while IDC estimates that corporate video traffic will more then double in the next two years with greater then half of all corporations currently using some form of IP video. IP video is either deployed from the bottom up or top down. Click-to-conference plus enterprise based Web 2.0 social networking and collaboration initiatives are deployed from the bottom up while video surveillance, digital signage, TelePresence, and one-to-many for training and executive-to-employee briefings broadcast are top down. In short, business and IT leaders will not have total control over IP video deployments and are advised to prepare your networks for IP video. Kumar Srikantan Senior Director of Cisco's Campus Switching Systems Technology Group joins me to discuss best practices to guide IT leaders to prepare their networks in support of IP video services. If your corporation is using IP video, then you need to listen to this podcast.

Lippis Report Issue 104: Network Convergence 2.0: Is Your Network Ready for IP Video?

April 21st, 2008

IP video is usually discussed in the context of wide area communications or providing videoconferencing between distant sites. But IP video is being massively consumed within office buildings and campuses. The bulk of IP video traffic is generated from video on demand and videoconferencing applications. IP video is a set of applications that are being layered on top of today's converged voice and data IP networks creating what we call "œconverged networking 2.0". IP video streams made up of multicast, unicast, one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-many video flows are adding to an already large matrix of traffic patterns and logical networks, with unique requirements and attributes, which propagate throughout a converged network. Converged networking 2.0 supports this new set of applications, creating a single IP network which supports voice, data and video.

Read the rest of this entry »

Productivity Success Factors for the Mid-Market: How to gain competitive advantage using the latest conferencing and collaboration technologies.

Get the White Paper

April 21st, 2008

By Blair Pleasant UCStrategies

Unified Communications (UC) technologies such as conferencing and collaboration have been providing significant benefits including enhanced productivity to large enterprises for several years, but the mid-market "“ those companies with between 100 and 1000 employees "“ are just now embracing these technologies for competitive advantage. The mid-market faces unique challenges that unified communications and related technologies can help address. New products and services are being introduced, aimed at the mid-market, to help this segment realize the benefits of improved communications. Mid-market companies focused on improving worker productivity and business results can implement conferencing and collaboration technologies to help workers better communicate with customers, partners, and co-workers. These conferencing and collaboration technologies and tools are helping mid-market companies solve their business problems while making their business processes more efficient and effective.

The Cisco QuantumFlow Processor: Cisco’s Next Generation Network Processor

Get the White Paper

April 21st, 2008

By Cisco Systems

Cisco realized five years ago that the network edge was changing. The existing network-processor design would not be sufficient to meet the needs of exploding video traffic growth and emerging collaborative applications, nor meet the need for borderless networking where any service could be offered securely anywhere in the network. General-purpose processors enabled flexible network services and rapid feature development but lacked traffic prioritization mechanisms and suffered from slow forwarding performance. Over the last few years, faster network-processor technology became a mainstream technology that is more than doubling annually. Even in the past few years however, many of the multi-core network processors available offered high throughputs but limited service flexibility with fixed feature pipeline processing and inflexible classification and packet-processing programming languages. The Cisco QuantumFlow Processor takes network-processor technology to the next level by moving away from other rigid forms of processing technology to one of true massively parallel and flexible flow processing for classification, services integration, and traffic management.

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers: Achieving Energy Efficiency through Service Integration

Get the White Paper

April 21st, 2008

By Cisco Systems

Environmental responsibility has become an important topic of discussion in the last few years"”not only in the general public, but in businesses as well. Many major corporations have begun to institute green policies that guide the manner in which they manage their operations. As companies work toward minimizing their effect on the environment, they must examine several areas:

Business operations, especially as related to the effect of space, power, and cooling on energy consumption;

Supplemental benefits of carbon reduction such as reduced numbers of employees commuting and traveling;

Equipment longevity to forestall e-waste and management policies for the responsible retirement of obsolete equipment;

Selection of suppliers and vendors that operate their businesses in an ecologically conscientious fashion.

The innovative, new Cisco® ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Router can be an important component in helping you achieve your overall environmental objectives. By consolidating the capabilities of multiple single-function devices and allowing you to instantly turn on new services, the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Router provides an energy-efficient and long-lasting deployment alternative. This approach offers you direct benefits, such as reduced rack space, power, and cooling requirements. In addition, it facilitates many secondary benefits, including the ability to reduce employee travel and training costs.

A New Era of WAN Design Emerges Thanks To Ciscos New Aggregation Services Router

Listen to the Podcast

April 21st, 2008

Picture of Marie HattarWith every IT paradigm transition comes not only increased bandwidth requirements, but an increased reliance on network services such as security, remote VPN access, QoS, and application classification to support a wide variety of corporate applications. Also new WAN services such as Metro Ethernet and 3G wireless are redefining WAN design. Between these demanding new applications and WAN options, lies the aggregation router, which has been primarily a narrowband device connecting sites via Frame Relay and MPLS, and thus has presented a bottleneck to new real-time collaboration technologies. This is all about to change, because a new era of WAN design has emerged. New router platforms are rare as their life-cycle is usually greater then a decade. So when one is announced it's the beginning of a long industry cycle and when it's Cisco who's making the announcement you know that it's an industry-changing event. Cisco has announced its Aggregation Services Router, or ASR, 1000 Series, which is focused on the high-end enterprise WAN and service provider edges. The ASR value proposition is rooted in a reduction of appliance hardware, lower WAN cost through aggregation and lower operational spend thanks to management break-throughs. Marie Hattar, Senior Director of Network Systems and Security solutions marketing at Cisco Systems is my guest as we dive into the ASR and new WAN design options it enables. To get the cost out and performance into your WAN, listen to this podcast.

Kent School District Deploys New Wiring Closet Switches And Gets New IT Services While Keeping Operational Cost Constant

Listen to the Podcast

April 18th, 2008

Thuan NguyenThe Kent School District is the fourth largest school in the state of Washington comprised of four high schools, six middle schools, 28 elementary schools and two academies with nearly 27,000 students and 3200 employees. Kent's IT staff were challenged to support a doubling of networked computers, new IT service requirements including virtualized desktops, smart boards, video surveillance and unified communications all while keeping their operational budget constant. Kent under went a district-wide network refresh, where the IT team sought to replace the current edge network that included products from ProCurve Networking by HP and 3Com for Cisco. I talk with Thuan Nguyen, Director of IT at Kent School District about his options, decisions and results. It's a fascinating case of what can be done in IT today.

Securing the Unified Communications-Enabled Enterprise

Get the White Paper

April 8th, 2008

By Cisco Systems

Integrated communications systems are inherently more secure than traditional stand-alone phone and messaging systems. In today´s global economy, traditional time and geographical boundaries are vanishing. Many businesses have adopted a 24-hours-a-day approach to serving customers, who may be located anywhere in the world, in any time zone. For businesses, government agencies, and academic organizations to thrive in this dynamic market, personnel must remain accessible to colleagues and customers worldwide. Employees who, like the customers they serve, are geographically distributed and mobile require the capability to securely obtain information from wherever they are to help their organizations compete successfully.

Research reveals a significant negative business effect when workgroups experience delays in reaching primary decision makers. Delays are exacerbated when organizations run multiple, stand-alone systems that do not provide employees with an integrated and secure way to conduct and manage their many forms of communication.

Lippis Report Issue 103: Wiring Closet Switches Gain Strategic IT Value Label

April 7th, 2008

The edge or access of a network connects all end-points into an enterprise network infrastructure. The network edge is made up of wiring closet switches, which are usually fixed Ethernet switching devices. The market for wiring closet switches is evolving.

In the previous decade IT organizations had traditionally pursued an edge network that utilized shared hubs and switches to provide connectivity to end-points. The primary buying criteria was price per port with low price being paramount. These switching devices possessed few network services such as layer 2 forwarding, Virtual Local Area Networking (VLAN), Routing Information Protocol (RIP) and a configuration tool as their primary network management capabilities. In short the old network access model provided best effort connectivity services with little to no operational control.

Read the rest of this entry »

Managed Services: Taking Advantage of Managed Services in the High-End Enterprise

Get the White Paper

April 7th, 2008

By Cisco

This white paper explores the challenges and solutions for high-end enterprises using managed services. There are two key reasons for a large enterprise to adopt managed services:

    Consistent and reliable services with a global reach
  • Operational cost reductions

Cisco® has a successful track record with both enterprises using managed services and service providers offering managed services. This white paper provides an overview of the key challenges and solutions for the high-end enterprise using managed services.

Securing the Unified Communications"“Enabled Enterprise

Get the White Paper

April 7th, 2008

By Cisco Systems

Integrated communications systems are inherently more secure than traditional stand-alone phone and messaging systems. In today's global economy, traditional time and geographical boundaries are vanishing. Many businesses have adopted a 24-hours-a-day approach to serving customers, who may be located anywhere in the world, in any time zone. For businesses, government agencies, and academic organizations to thrive in this dynamic market, personnel must remain accessible to colleagues and customers worldwide. Employees who, like the customers they serve, are geographically distributed and mobile require the capability to securely obtain information from wherever they are to help their organizations compete successfully.

Research reveals a significant negative business effect when workgroups experience delays in reaching primary decision makers. Delays are exacerbated when organizations run multiple, stand-alone systems that do not provide employees with an integrated and secure way to conduct and manage their many forms of communication.

Extend the Value of Microsoft Office Applications with Avaya Unified Communications: A step-by-step guide for IT leaders on the considerations, options and benefits of unifying communications

Get the White Paper

April 7th, 2008

By Microsoft and Avaya

To realize the value of unified communications, most IT leaders will have to integrate new communications solutions within existing infrastructures. In doing so, business and IT leaders will want to assess the breadth of integration options and the depth of integration. Options should encompass all communications applications that can be unified: telephony, messaging, mobility, presence and conferencing. Microsoft and Avaya have leveraged their considerable individual technologies, platforms and roadmaps to create a combined vision to make real-time and non-real-time collaboration a reality for enterprises. The mantra of anytime-and-anywhere communications is now being united with "œany-way". Learn how IT leaders can now increase productivity in measurable ways by allowing:

“click-to-communicate” from familiar desktop interfaces; integration of in-house audio and Web conferencing to reduce expense and make meetings more effective; integration of e-mail, voice mail and calendars into a single client; reduction in total cost of ownership on server management; extension of functionality to mobile and remote workers;

Is There Enough Power in PoE Ports To Run 802.11n Access Points?

Listen to the Podcast

April 7th, 2008

This Podcast's Guests, Craig Mathias and Luc Roy802.11n offers impressive improvements in rate, range, and price/performance thanks to significantly higher processing and power consumption than older WLAN Access Points (APs). A key question in the decision to deploy 802.11n APs is whether there is enough power delivered over 802.3af Power over Ethernet (PoE) switch ports or compliant power injectors to run these Aps, since 802.11n's increased bandwidth and processing may require more than the 12.95 Watts provided in 802.3af switch ports. I interview Craig Mathias, a Principal at Farpoint Group and author of the recent report “802.11n Access Points and Power over Ethernet: Key Considerations” and Luc Roy, VP of Enterprise Mobility at Siemens Enterprise Communications which is shipping an 802.11n AP that operates with 802.3af PoE. Craig tested the Siemens AP3620 802.11n APs and shares the results.

Demystifying 802.11n: Questions and Answers

Visit the Link

April 2nd, 2008

Join Nick Lippis and Bill Kish, CTO of Ruckus Wireless on Wednesday April 23rd at 10 a.m. PDT / 1 p.m. EDT for a live conversation about 802.11n over the web. We’ll address the hard questions about 802.11n installations, provide best practices and answer your questions to ease your next generation WLAN deployment. RSVP today for this live and interactive conversation.

Register here »